MLL Courses Taught in English


(to view courses taught in the target language, click the language links to the left)

Spring 2017

MLL 096 (ASIA, WGSS 096) - Sex, War, Women, Art - 4 Credits (HU) (CBE Diversity)
1:10pm - 2:25pm (TR)
Through the study of selected visual, cinematic, literary, and political works in their historical and social contexts, students will gain knowledge of cultures in Japan. This course examines various cultures from the perspectives of gender and sexuality as constitutive factors of Japanese society. Materials include a film depicting the romantic life of a samurai, art works by contemporary artists, and sex workers, impacted by the Japanese empire in Okinawa, Shanghai, colonial Korea, as well as women in Zainichi Korean communities. This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of Japanese language or culture is required. Taught in English. The course is designed for students with and without previous knowledge of Japan. No Japanese language ability is required. All lectures and readings are in English. Films are in Japanese with English subtitles. Students who are interested in gender and sexuality in Japan, as well as colonial and postcolonial issues, impacted by the Japanese empire, are strongly encouraged to take this course. By the end of the term, students will have acquired broad and critical knowledge of Japan. The course is open to freshmen with the consultation of Professor Nobuko Yamasaki (noy215@lehigh.edu).
 
MLL 097 (ASIA 097) - Protest Narratives in Modern China - 4 credits (HU) (CBE Global)
2:35pm - 3:50pm (MW)
Thomas Chen
This course has three main objectives: first, to introduce the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, a significant historical event in modern China; second, to engage with Chinese novels, documentaries, and fiction-feature films that evoke this event; and third, to examine the effects of state censorship on culture. The course is divided into three sections, with a paper due following each: Initial Responses, Between Public and Private, and Dystopic Visions. Among the topics we will cover are China's capitalist transformation, mode of government, and personal vs. collective memory. Each student will also present on a particular work in class. All materials are available in English translation. 
 
MLL 098 (GS 098) - The Global Workplace: Preparing to Work Around the World - 4 credits (HU)
2:35pm - 3:50pm (MW)
Mary Nicholas
What does it mean to have global competence? Everyone talks about it, but what does it actually entail and how do we acquire it? We'll investigate this question through stories about work in its endless variety around the world. As we read and discuss narratives from Asia, Europe, Latin America, Africa, and the United States, we'll work on developing and showcasing our own expertise in interpersonal, team, and interpretive communication. Assignments will include exercises in critical thinking, creativity, teamwork, and analytical research. Over the course of the semester, students will also create digital portfolios to demonstrate their sustained global commitment and their growing abilities to thrive in today's global workplace.
 
MLL 128 (GS 128) - Literature and Globalization - 4 credits (HU)
11:10am - 12:25pm (MW)
Marie-Hélène Chabut
An introduction to fiction as it reflects and discusses major issues related to globalization.  The readings will include a selection of fiction from a diversity of world regions and will introduce the students to a theoretical reflection on the role of literary writing in a globalizing world.  Students will be able to gain appreciation for the written fictional text as it takes on a diversity of issues related to globalization in a variety of world regions and cultural perspectives.
 
MLL 165 (ASIA 165) - Love and Revolution in Shanghai - 4 credits (HU) (CBE Global)
11:10am - 12:25pm (MW)
Constance Cook
Project-based course examines human relationships and political-economic changes in Shanghai through the lens of literature, film, and a selection of other readings.  Discussion of conflicts between and influences of pre-communist, communist, and capitalist systems as played out in the Shanghai urban arena.
 
MLL 197 (ASIA, REL 197) - Drinking and Immortality - 4 credits (HU)
2:35pm - 3:50pm (MW)
Constance Cook
This class explores modes of transcendence and their expression in literature and art, but most especially poetry. The primary focus is on the role of drinking alcoholic beverages in traditional Chinese society and religion, but also on other modes and what is meant by the search for immortality - and the use of inner versus outer alchemy - will be examined.
 
MLL 202 (ENGL, GS, LAS 202) - Latin America in Fact, in Fiction - 4 credits (HU)
12:45pm - 2:00pm (MW)
Matthew Bush
This class couples a survey of Latin American literature in translation with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Latin America.  Departing initially from readings of literary and cinematographic works, our analyses will engage methodologies from multiple disciplines including history, sociology, and cultural studies.  Accordingly, this course will examine critical developments in Latin American aesthetics along with the cultural climates in which they matured.  This course assumes no prior study of Spanish, Portuguese, or Latin American culture.
 
MLL 303, MLL 403 (GERM, WGSS 303)(WGSS 403) - Grimms' Fairy Tales: Folklore, Feminism, Film - 4 credits (HU)(CBE Global)
2:35pm - 3:50pm (MW)
Vera Stegmann
This intercultural history of the Grimms’ fairy tales investigates how folktale types and gender stereotypes developed and became models for children and adults.  The course covers the literary fairy tale in Germany. Europe, and America.  “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Cinderella,” and “Sleeping Beauty” exist not only in the Grimms’ collection but in many forms of world literature/film.  Modern authors have rewritten fairy tales in feminist ways, promoting social change.  Taught in English.  German language students may receive a German component.
 
MLL 397 (FREN 322) - Contemporary French Films - 4 credits (HU)
11:10am - 12:25pm (MW)
Marie-Sophie Armstrong
In this course we will analyze some ten French films from the late 1950s to the present.  Through these movies, representative of such film movements such as the New Wave, Cinema du look, Extreme Cinema, etc., we will explore the cinematographic language and its possibilities, and examine issues of gender, power, class, colonialism, and madness.  Films by Truffaut, Godard, Beineix, Denis, Kassovitz, Haneke, Berliner, Varda, Dardenne, Dumont.  Course is taught bilingually in French and English.
 

Fall 2016

MLL 075 (43317) (Crosslist: ASIA, HIST) - Chinese Civilization - 4 Credits (HU) (SS)
2:35pm - 3:50pm (MW)
Constance Cook

MLL 090-010 (41824) (Crosslist: ASIA) - Dreaming in Pre-Modern China - 4 credits (HU)
The novel, Dream of the Red Chamber, takes the readers into the bedrooms, dreams, and secret gardens of a large gentry family of the late 17th century in China.  There are ghosts, goddesses, and scabby priests that thread their ways amongst the fine ladies and not-so-honorable men.  To add to the mystery is the supernatural origin of the main character who must relearn his true self through life among mortals (or semi-mortals).  This text functions not only as the Shakespeare of China, the foundation of modern literature, but is known throughout Asia in multiple forms of popular cultural media.
11:10am - 12:25pm (MW)
Constance Cook

MLL 090-011 (43392) - Re-reading Russia: Understanding the Colossus through Literature - 4 credits (HU)
Russia is the largest country in the world and one of the few to bridge both East and West.  But for most people, Russia remains the "riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma" that Churchill described in 1939.  In this course, we will investigate that conundrum by reading some of the best Russian literature of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries for what it can tell us about the "mysterious Russian soul."  Our focus will be on short stories from a broad cross-section of modern writers from Pushkin to the present.
1:10pm - 2:00pm (MWF)
Mary Nicholas

MLL 140-010 (43085) (Crosslist: ANTH, COGS) - Introduction to Linguistics - 4 credits (SS)
12:45pm - 2:00pm (MW)
Kiri Lee